The Iconic Edition
Advice
|14 Aug|3 mins

5 True Crime Podcasts That’ll Give You Goosebumps

How many have you listened to?
Lucy E Cousins
14 Aug
Share:

Love true crime? So do we. We’ve binged on Serial (yes, the first series is the best) as well as S-Town (the twists!). And we can’t wait until the film version of Dirty John – with a rumoured Eric Bana as John – comes out next year.

But if you’re looking for your next poddy fix, look no further. Here is our tried and tested list of what to subscribe to next:

Phoebe's Fall

Produced by The Age newspaper, this fascinating six-part podcast follows the bizarre death of 24-year old Melbournian woman, Phoebe Handsjuk, who ‘fell’ 40m down a garbage shoot in her apartment building. You’ll have your own suspicions very early on about why and how this happened, and so it will make for both frustrating and compelling listening. The podcast even managed to have an effect on the Coroners Act and how cases are classified, which is impressive.

Teacher’s Pet

The 1981 disappearance of Sydney mother of two Lynn Dawson didn’t make much news at the time. Maybe that was because her husband, Chris Dawson, was a former rugby ‘hero’, or maybe it’s because he didn’t report her missing for six whole weeks. Either way, when he did finally speak to police, schoolteacher Chris said she had run off with a religious cult, leaving him alone. Yet, two days after she reportedly ‘left’ her husband and two young children, Chris’ 16-year old school girl lover, Joanne, moved in with him and his two young daughters and started wearing Lynn’s clothes and wedding rings. Suspicious, much?

TRACE

This podcast follows the tragic stabbing of Maria James in the back of her Melbourne bookshop a few decades ago. The subsequent police bungling, unexpected suspects and incredible twists make this obsessive listening. It certainly makes you wonder how many other cold cases could have been solved with a little more care given to the crime scene and evidence. This ABC Radio podcast stands out because of its high level of investigating, thorough reporting and relatively unbiased narration.

Black Hands

Not one for the faint hearted, this is the story of New Zealand’s most infamous mass murder case. This podcast takes you back to the morning when 22-year-old David Bain returns home after his usual paper run to find his parents and three siblings murdered. There are two main suspects, one is dead and the other is David himself. This case has literally divided New Zealand, and with 3 million downloads (and counting) so has this podcast and its findings.

Unravel

When a body is found on the railway tracks one frosty morning outside of Tamworth the obvious explanation by the police is suicide. But as the true horror of the situation opens up, the victim’s family and friends aren’t convinced. This ABC radio podcast, based on reporter Allan Clarke’s five-year investigation, not only sheds light on what happened that night but also makes a poignant and very relevant reflection on the treatment of Indigenous Australians by our authorities and the media. It’s a message every Australian should hear and understand.

Advice
|14 Aug|3 mins

5 True Crime Podcasts That’ll Give You Goosebumps

How many have you listened to?
Lucy E Cousins
14 Aug
Share:

Love true crime? So do we. We’ve binged on Serial (yes, the first series is the best) as well as S-Town (the twists!). And we can’t wait until the film version of Dirty John – with a rumoured Eric Bana as John – comes out next year.

But if you’re looking for your next poddy fix, look no further. Here is our tried and tested list of what to subscribe to next:

Phoebe's Fall

Produced by The Age newspaper, this fascinating six-part podcast follows the bizarre death of 24-year old Melbournian woman, Phoebe Handsjuk, who ‘fell’ 40m down a garbage shoot in her apartment building. You’ll have your own suspicions very early on about why and how this happened, and so it will make for both frustrating and compelling listening. The podcast even managed to have an effect on the Coroners Act and how cases are classified, which is impressive.

Teacher’s Pet

The 1981 disappearance of Sydney mother of two Lynn Dawson didn’t make much news at the time. Maybe that was because her husband, Chris Dawson, was a former rugby ‘hero’, or maybe it’s because he didn’t report her missing for six whole weeks. Either way, when he did finally speak to police, schoolteacher Chris said she had run off with a religious cult, leaving him alone. Yet, two days after she reportedly ‘left’ her husband and two young children, Chris’ 16-year old school girl lover, Joanne, moved in with him and his two young daughters and started wearing Lynn’s clothes and wedding rings. Suspicious, much?

TRACE

This podcast follows the tragic stabbing of Maria James in the back of her Melbourne bookshop a few decades ago. The subsequent police bungling, unexpected suspects and incredible twists make this obsessive listening. It certainly makes you wonder how many other cold cases could have been solved with a little more care given to the crime scene and evidence. This ABC Radio podcast stands out because of its high level of investigating, thorough reporting and relatively unbiased narration.

Black Hands

Not one for the faint hearted, this is the story of New Zealand’s most infamous mass murder case. This podcast takes you back to the morning when 22-year-old David Bain returns home after his usual paper run to find his parents and three siblings murdered. There are two main suspects, one is dead and the other is David himself. This case has literally divided New Zealand, and with 3 million downloads (and counting) so has this podcast and its findings.

Unravel

When a body is found on the railway tracks one frosty morning outside of Tamworth the obvious explanation by the police is suicide. But as the true horror of the situation opens up, the victim’s family and friends aren’t convinced. This ABC radio podcast, based on reporter Allan Clarke’s five-year investigation, not only sheds light on what happened that night but also makes a poignant and very relevant reflection on the treatment of Indigenous Australians by our authorities and the media. It’s a message every Australian should hear and understand.

Lucy E Cousins
Writer
Related Articles