The Iconic Edition
News
|12 Feb|6 mins

How Our Screen Time Report Really Made Us Feel

You have the same 24 hours Beyoncé has. Hands up if you spend most of those on your phone…
Elle Glass
12 Feb
Share:

How many times a day do you look at your phone? (We’re guessing you can count this as one of them?) Very rarely are we anywhere without ours. A yoga class or a massage is just about the only time I’m unplugged – and even that, it’s only for an hour (an hour 10, max).

My boyfriend, just yesterday, accused me over ‘never being here’ when in reality I’m always here. (... and on my phone). On Instagram. Researching a story. Checking comments on our social. Scrolling through new arrivals.

A piece in The New York Times, though, recently cited a study of romantic relationships (as found in the journal of Psychology of Popular Media Culture) pointed that “smartphone dependency is significantly linked to relationship uncertainty”.

What he / they are getting at (I think) is that it’s a question of presence. Of attention. Of being rather than scrolling.

Any iPhone-carrying consumer will have been made aware of just how often they’re looking at their phone on the daily thanks to the weekly Screen Time Report. It’s an activity report sharing the total time spent on each app, along with how many push notifications are received, and even how often the phone is physically picked up.

We knew we spent a lot of time on our phone – but THAT much?

Sometimes, though, it’s good to reminded of exactly where our hours go.

“The other day, a friend asked me what I was shedding this year, the things I was letting go of that were no longer serving me,” notes travel writer and adventurer Nina Karnikowski on her Instagram @travelswithnina.

“It got me thinking about the 24 precious hours we have each day. With eight gone to sleep (hopefully), eight gone to work (at least), two gone to eating, one gone to exercising and two gone to housework, there are only five left!

“And that’s without even touching on childcare (or for me, pooch care), socialising, downtime, creative side projects and dozens of other things I’ve forgotten. When you think about it that way, it really bears thinking about where some of the energy and time sucks are.”

Just imagine what you could do with your time if you set that phone down, if only for an extra few hours a day.

It’s so hard to though. One minute on Instagram can so easily turn into an hour (or five). Time management and productivity expert Julie Morgenstern told The New York Times that our perception of time is “this ethereal, relative, slippery, conceptual thing”.

Also that:

“It’s not. It’s 24-hour cycles, seven days a week. You have 168 hours to work with every week.”

Like Insta tells us: You have the same 24 hours Beyonce has.

To quote the title of possibly the best Jack Nicholson movie ever: something’s got to give. And I’m guessing in my case that ‘something’ is a little screen time.

Morgenstern is what she calls a ‘time realist’. That is, someone who works out exactly what they can do with their 24 hours a day. The rest of us are ‘time optimists’ (also a phrase of Morgenstern’s) who always think we can do way more than we can in reality. We overbook, over commit and generally believe that things take ‘no time at all’.

Until we see, thanks to our Screen Time Report, just how many hours we spent on Instagram this morning.

"It's not about 'what can I accomplish?'” writes Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor and the author of Daring Greatly (among other should-read titles), “but 'what do I want to accomplish?'”

It’s about, Brown says, a paradigm shift. Making a choice about where your time is spent.

Karnikowski’s take is one I’ve screenshot as a reminder:

“... For me, this year, I’m letting go of small drains like persisting with bad books and spending too much time on social media, to bigger drains like work that doesn’t excite me and relentless complainers rather than solution finders, so I have maximum time to create and build and plan adventures. To get the best energy flowing around me so I can make more excellent things happen in my life.”

I do realise, though, that that reminder is on my phone.

News
|12 Feb|6 mins

How Our Screen Time Report Really Made Us Feel

You have the same 24 hours Beyoncé has. Hands up if you spend most of those on your phone…
Elle Glass
12 Feb
Share:

How many times a day do you look at your phone? (We’re guessing you can count this as one of them?) Very rarely are we anywhere without ours. A yoga class or a massage is just about the only time I’m unplugged – and even that, it’s only for an hour (an hour 10, max).

My boyfriend, just yesterday, accused me over ‘never being here’ when in reality I’m always here. (... and on my phone). On Instagram. Researching a story. Checking comments on our social. Scrolling through new arrivals.

A piece in The New York Times, though, recently cited a study of romantic relationships (as found in the journal of Psychology of Popular Media Culture) pointed that “smartphone dependency is significantly linked to relationship uncertainty”.

What he / they are getting at (I think) is that it’s a question of presence. Of attention. Of being rather than scrolling.

Any iPhone-carrying consumer will have been made aware of just how often they’re looking at their phone on the daily thanks to the weekly Screen Time Report. It’s an activity report sharing the total time spent on each app, along with how many push notifications are received, and even how often the phone is physically picked up.

We knew we spent a lot of time on our phone – but THAT much?

Sometimes, though, it’s good to reminded of exactly where our hours go.

“The other day, a friend asked me what I was shedding this year, the things I was letting go of that were no longer serving me,” notes travel writer and adventurer Nina Karnikowski on her Instagram @travelswithnina.

“It got me thinking about the 24 precious hours we have each day. With eight gone to sleep (hopefully), eight gone to work (at least), two gone to eating, one gone to exercising and two gone to housework, there are only five left!

“And that’s without even touching on childcare (or for me, pooch care), socialising, downtime, creative side projects and dozens of other things I’ve forgotten. When you think about it that way, it really bears thinking about where some of the energy and time sucks are.”

Just imagine what you could do with your time if you set that phone down, if only for an extra few hours a day.

It’s so hard to though. One minute on Instagram can so easily turn into an hour (or five). Time management and productivity expert Julie Morgenstern told The New York Times that our perception of time is “this ethereal, relative, slippery, conceptual thing”.

Also that:

“It’s not. It’s 24-hour cycles, seven days a week. You have 168 hours to work with every week.”

Like Insta tells us: You have the same 24 hours Beyonce has.

To quote the title of possibly the best Jack Nicholson movie ever: something’s got to give. And I’m guessing in my case that ‘something’ is a little screen time.

Morgenstern is what she calls a ‘time realist’. That is, someone who works out exactly what they can do with their 24 hours a day. The rest of us are ‘time optimists’ (also a phrase of Morgenstern’s) who always think we can do way more than we can in reality. We overbook, over commit and generally believe that things take ‘no time at all’.

Until we see, thanks to our Screen Time Report, just how many hours we spent on Instagram this morning.

"It's not about 'what can I accomplish?'” writes Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor and the author of Daring Greatly (among other should-read titles), “but 'what do I want to accomplish?'”

It’s about, Brown says, a paradigm shift. Making a choice about where your time is spent.

Karnikowski’s take is one I’ve screenshot as a reminder:

“... For me, this year, I’m letting go of small drains like persisting with bad books and spending too much time on social media, to bigger drains like work that doesn’t excite me and relentless complainers rather than solution finders, so I have maximum time to create and build and plan adventures. To get the best energy flowing around me so I can make more excellent things happen in my life.”

I do realise, though, that that reminder is on my phone.

Elle Glass
Writer
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