The Iconic Edition
News
|11 Jul|3 mins

Swimming Against the Tide

While there is much to be done to protect the earth’s oceans, these swimwear brands are doing their bit to help
Nick Banks
11 Jul
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Here’s a shocking forecast - by 2050 there will be more plastic waste in the planet’s oceans than there will be fish. Bottles, bags, food containers, microbeads, you name it: plastic trash of all kinds is swilling around the furthest corners of the earth, affecting marine life and creating a huge mess of delicate ecosystems. But while it will take action by governments of nations all over the world to tackle the situation head on – and years of hard work - various companies are at least doing their bit to help preserve the bluest parts of our planet with a range of sustainable initiatives. Perhaps not surprisingly, swimwear brands are at the forefront.

News
|11 Jul|3 mins

Swimming Against the Tide

While there is much to be done to protect the earth’s oceans, these swimwear brands are doing their bit to help
Nick Banks
11 Jul
Share:

Here’s a shocking forecast - by 2050 there will be more plastic waste in the planet’s oceans than there will be fish. Bottles, bags, food containers, microbeads, you name it: plastic trash of all kinds is swilling around the furthest corners of the earth, affecting marine life and creating a huge mess of delicate ecosystems. But while it will take action by governments of nations all over the world to tackle the situation head on – and years of hard work - various companies are at least doing their bit to help preserve the bluest parts of our planet with a range of sustainable initiatives. Perhaps not surprisingly, swimwear brands are at the forefront.

Quiksilver Mens Highline 20" Boardshorts made with REPREVE™

For one example, step forward Quiksilver who have, for the past five years, produced a collection of boardshorts that not only look good, but do good, thanks to their construction using REPREVE™ yarn – a type of fibre created from recycled plastic bottles. About 11 bottles go in to the production of each pair of shorts and, as a result, the surfwear brand has recently reached a stunning milestone: 100 million plastic bottles have now been recycled through the REPREVE™ program.

This is no fad or idle gesture, but a genuine move towards a more sustainable production process that mirrors the approach of other swimwear labels.

Tigerlily Capofaro bikini

There's more to Tigerlily than meets the eye. Tigerlily has been making a number of their products from recycled materials for years; it is even built into the brand’s core philosophy, which emphasises ethical sourcing and sustainability. Principally they use Econyl® polyamide, a fibre created using “100% regenerated material” – mainly plastic pieces that may well have otherwise ended up in the ocean - in the production of their beautifully vibrant, boho bikinis.

Seapia Tonia bikini

Another company to follow the same path is Seapia, which again produces high-quality, on trend bikinis and costumes from fabrics that have been created using discarded plastics, in a bid to protect the habitat most important to any swimwear brand – the ocean. They also work hard to keep their carbon footprint at a lower level and use a local labour force for a more sustainable model.

The Rocks Push Tama Dots Shorts. Hero image created by LuqueStock - Freepik.com

The same can be said about The Rocks Push, who design their eye-catching, patterned swim shorts using recycled nylon that once made up numerous abandoned fishing nets salvaged from countries all over the world: Pakistan, Turkey, Thailand and Portugal, to name a few. For the Sydney-based label, their sustainable, charitable approach doesn’t stop there. They also donate profits to protecting Australia’s most important marine site – the extraordinary, UNESCO-listed Great Barrier Reef.

And it is the work of labels like this, combining a sustainable model with the highest standards in design, that gives hope. Perhaps by 2050 that forecast won’t come true after all.

Nick Banks
Writer
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