The Iconic Edition
Advice
|13 Feb|7 mins

In Need Of A Wake-up Call?

To snooze or not to snooze?
Elle Glass
13 Feb
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There never feels like there are enough hours in the day. To work. To rest. To yoga. To see our friends and family. To watch Sex Education in its entirety in one sitting.

The solution?

For some: become a morning person.

I’ve always been lucky in that I’m one of those annoying 5am risers. I like that one, maybe two, hours in the morning where there’s no one else (in my immediate vicinity) awake. There’s no real distractions and getting stuff done doesn’t need to go hand-in-hand with getting dressed or even wearing pants. It’s, in short, heaven.

For many though, the thought of a 5am rise is utter and pure torture.

Still, The Wall Street Journal calls 4am the most productive hour, and regularly names powerhouses who cross their hearts on the virtues of getting up at that hour. Study after study makes headlines that rising early can up your smarts, your happiness and even your success.

“Also, of course, waking up early gives you a surge of power; you feel superior, smug. It’s also kind of like being vegan — I’m pretty sure there’s no one I talked with back then who I didn’t tell in some way, as quickly as possible, that I got up at 5am,” writes The Cut’s Edith Zimmermann in a piece appropriately headlined  It’s Astounding Just How Many Problem Can Be Solved By Waking Up Early.

She's right. Occasionally the clock hits 530 and I feel like I’ve wrapped almost everything on my to-do list. It’s like some kind of miracle.

Apparently though it's science. Research by biologist Christoph Randler found that “people whose performance peaks in the morning are ... more proactive than people who are at their best in the evening.”

It’s obviously a lot easier to do for those of use who don’t have, you know, a newborn or looming deadlines that are unmovable. But, if keen, how can you give this early morning business a bit of a go? Randler told Harvard Business Review:

“You could try shifting your daily cycle by going to bed earlier. Another thing you could do is go outside into the daylight early in the morning. The daylight resets your circadian clock and helps shift you toward morningness. If you go outside only in the evening, you tend to shift toward eveningness.”

Here's some more tips to help you set your alarm that little bit earlier without hitting snooze eight more times...

Advice
|13 Feb|7 mins

In Need Of A Wake-up Call?

To snooze or not to snooze?
Elle Glass
13 Feb
Share:

There never feels like there are enough hours in the day. To work. To rest. To yoga. To see our friends and family. To watch Sex Education in its entirety in one sitting.

The solution?

For some: become a morning person.

I’ve always been lucky in that I’m one of those annoying 5am risers. I like that one, maybe two, hours in the morning where there’s no one else (in my immediate vicinity) awake. There’s no real distractions and getting stuff done doesn’t need to go hand-in-hand with getting dressed or even wearing pants. It’s, in short, heaven.

For many though, the thought of a 5am rise is utter and pure torture.

Still, The Wall Street Journal calls 4am the most productive hour, and regularly names powerhouses who cross their hearts on the virtues of getting up at that hour. Study after study makes headlines that rising early can up your smarts, your happiness and even your success.

“Also, of course, waking up early gives you a surge of power; you feel superior, smug. It’s also kind of like being vegan — I’m pretty sure there’s no one I talked with back then who I didn’t tell in some way, as quickly as possible, that I got up at 5am,” writes The Cut’s Edith Zimmermann in a piece appropriately headlined  It’s Astounding Just How Many Problem Can Be Solved By Waking Up Early.

She's right. Occasionally the clock hits 530 and I feel like I’ve wrapped almost everything on my to-do list. It’s like some kind of miracle.

Apparently though it's science. Research by biologist Christoph Randler found that “people whose performance peaks in the morning are ... more proactive than people who are at their best in the evening.”

It’s obviously a lot easier to do for those of use who don’t have, you know, a newborn or looming deadlines that are unmovable. But, if keen, how can you give this early morning business a bit of a go? Randler told Harvard Business Review:

“You could try shifting your daily cycle by going to bed earlier. Another thing you could do is go outside into the daylight early in the morning. The daylight resets your circadian clock and helps shift you toward morningness. If you go outside only in the evening, you tend to shift toward eveningness.”

Here's some more tips to help you set your alarm that little bit earlier without hitting snooze eight more times...

Winona Ryder, thanks to Getty Images

The earlier you hit the sheets, the earlier you’ll be ready to rise
Keep in mind that this going to bed to SLEEP and not to watch another four hours of Netflix. This way you can still get your eight hours in.

Make your wake-up conditions conducive to, well, helping you wake up
Wake up to natural light where you can - this is harder in winter, but is a breeze in these last days of summer. This will trigger your body clock with an all-natural good morning.

Set realistic goals
Don’t go too hard too soon and set yourself up for failure. If your usual wake up time is currently 8, shoot for 7. Or, even 7.30.

Where possible, go phone free
We all know what the Instagram abyss looks like. Avoid at all costs as you slide between the sheets.

Make it your time, and your time only
The trick is to not let anyone know you’re up and about. This way you can have that hour all to yourself. To yoga, to read, to write, whatever.

Shoot for the same time every morning. Make that habit stick
Eventually your body will catch the drift and start sending you to bed early (surely nothing that great happens after 10pm anyway?).

Plan your morning the night before
Book that class. That way there’s no having to think about it, and the cancellation fee that will deter a sleep-in. I like to work in the morning and then exercise around the 6am mark. If I know what tasks I need to get through, I don't need to think. Instead, just follow my own list.

And make it  something to look forward to
Be it a class or just half an hour before the kids wake up. Some people just take the time to read the news and enjoy a cup of tea. Others meditate. This is your time. Enjoy it.

Ditch the snooze button
I’m a chronic snoozer (people in our apartment block have even left notes about it...). Learn from my mistakes: instead of starting that sleep cycle over (and over, and over, and over), get up first time. If you’re finding it hard to part ways with your eight-minute special, invest in an alarm clock that doesn't offer you that luxury. Or, just give in and set that alarm a little later ...

Elle Glass
Writer
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