The Iconic Edition
Advice
|3 Jan|4 mins

Where to Go Camping This Summer

Meet Australia’s most Instagrammable spots
Laura Collins
3 Jan
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Can’t bear the thought of another scorching summer spent cooling off with a hose in your parent’s backyard? Make a plan to go camping at one of these epic spots instead.

Noah Beach, Daintree National Park, Queensland

Sure, you could book a luxury glamping stay somewhere deep in the Daintree, but why not just camp out on the beach a few feet from it? Spend your days exploring the reef and the nearby rainforest, and your nights looking for constellations in the sky above. Take all the pictures you want, but you won’t be able to upload them to Instagram until you’re somewhere less remote.

Sites: 15 unpowered sites

Facilities: Basic (tap water, bio toilets)

What to bring: swimmers. With water this clear it'd almost be a waste if you didn't take a dip.

Killalea Reserve, Kiama, New South Wales

Close enough to Sydney to warrant a spontaneous weekend getaway, and with amazing surf breaks and swimming to keep everyone entertained, “The Farm” on NSW’s South Coast is an ocean lover’s paradise. It’s also close enough to Shellharbour town, in case you need to make a quick pizza dash if your campfire nachos go up in flames.

Sites: 53 unpowered sites

Facilities: Amenities block, undercover eating area with electric BBQs, designated communal camp fire pit and most sites have a small wood BBQ.

What to wear: gingham. When you're surrounded by lush greenery it's hard not to go OTT country style.

Advice
|3 Jan|4 mins

Where to Go Camping This Summer

Meet Australia’s most Instagrammable spots
Laura Collins
3 Jan
Share:

Can’t bear the thought of another scorching summer spent cooling off with a hose in your parent’s backyard? Make a plan to go camping at one of these epic spots instead.

Noah Beach, Daintree National Park, Queensland

Sure, you could book a luxury glamping stay somewhere deep in the Daintree, but why not just camp out on the beach a few feet from it? Spend your days exploring the reef and the nearby rainforest, and your nights looking for constellations in the sky above. Take all the pictures you want, but you won’t be able to upload them to Instagram until you’re somewhere less remote.

Sites: 15 unpowered sites

Facilities: Basic (tap water, bio toilets)

What to bring: swimmers. With water this clear it'd almost be a waste if you didn't take a dip.

Killalea Reserve, Kiama, New South Wales

Close enough to Sydney to warrant a spontaneous weekend getaway, and with amazing surf breaks and swimming to keep everyone entertained, “The Farm” on NSW’s South Coast is an ocean lover’s paradise. It’s also close enough to Shellharbour town, in case you need to make a quick pizza dash if your campfire nachos go up in flames.

Sites: 53 unpowered sites

Facilities: Amenities block, undercover eating area with electric BBQs, designated communal camp fire pit and most sites have a small wood BBQ.

What to wear: gingham. When you're surrounded by lush greenery it's hard not to go OTT country style.

Scuba diving, Booderee National Park. Credit: June Anderson, Parks Australia

Cave Beach, Booderee National Park, New South Wales

The idyllic campgrounds within Jervis Bay’s Booderee National Park are crazy popular, so much so that you have to enter a ballot to (hopefully) nab a spot during peak periods. Not for Cave Beach though. You’ll still need to book, but it’s not quite so competitive. We love its prime location and off-the-grid feel. Situated 300m from the car park, packing light is essential, and you’ll probably receive a few visitors over breakfast – the local kangaroos.

Sites: 35 unpowered sites

Facilities: Fresh water, toilets, cold-water showers, a sheltered gas BBQ area and wood BBQs.

What to bring: a decent weekender bag. Save yourself from taking too many trips back to the car by packing only what you need and what you can fit into one duffel.

Ryans Den, Great Ocean Walk, Victoria

Not for the faint of heart, this small campground is ideally placed along the Great Ocean Walk and offers epic views out across Bass Strait and the Southern Ocean. If you’re looking for a holiday of a different kind this season, undertake the 8-day, 91 km Great Ocean Walk and you’ll get to experience all the spectacular sites along the trail.

Sites: 8 unpowered sites

Facilities: Basic (tank water, picnic tables, composting toilets and a kitchen shelter).

What to bring: quality outdoor apparel. Sure it's sunny and warm during the day, but once it gets dark the temperatures can drop so it's worth adding a warm jacket to your kit.

Vivonne Bay, Kangaroo Island, South Australia

Kangaroo Island is home to one of the world’s best hotels – Southern Ocean Lodge – but there’s no need to spring for the five-star stay, because there are plenty of campgrounds on the island that offer all the scenery at a fraction of the cost. The campground at Vivonne Bay is a short walk to the beach, and it’s pet friendly too.

Sites: Powered and unpowered sites

Facilities: Amenities block, sheltered picnic area and BBQ facilities.

What to bring: your four-legged friend. It's not often that you're allowed to take your furry family members on holiday - just be sure to follow the park rules so that everyone can have a good time.

Whitehaven Beach, Whitsunday Island, Queensland

The scent of eucalyptus fills the air, and the sound of the waves lapping the shore is the soundtrack to your trip. With space for no more than 36 people, this isolated campground is perfect for couples and friends alike. Leave your phone charger at home, and enjoy getting back to nature.

Sites: 7 unpowered sites

Facilities: Hybrid toilets, picnic tables.

What to bring: no doubt you'll be living in your boardshorts but don't forget to pack some sunnies too.

Cape Le Grand National Park - Lucky Bay, Photo: Greg Tossel

Honeymoon Bay, Freycinet National Park, Tasmania

Romantic in nature and name, these sites are in high demand over summer, so you’ll need to enter a ballot and cross your fingers. Overlooking the ultra-pretty Honeymoon Bay, you’ll spend your days swimming, sunning and hiking throughout the park. If you don’t manage to nab a spot here, there are a few other equally great campgrounds in the National Park.

Sites: 7 unpowered sites

Facilities: Electric BBQs, picnic tables, non-treated water and toilets.

Lucky Bay, Cape Le Grand National Park, Western Australia

Whether you’re all about the activities on a camping trip, or plan on using the time to lay on a beach for eight hours straight (with sunscreen, please!), Lucky Bay is a little slice of heaven that caters to everyone. White sand and sparkling blue water make the beach a major drawcard, but so do the kangaroos who call it home 365 days a year.

Sites: 62 unpowered sites

Facilities: Solar-heated showers, toilets, sheltered BBQ area.

What to bring: beach inflatables. Just remember to take your floating flamingo back home with you when you leave.

Laura Collins
Writer
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